NEWS – DBA

DBA’S WORK WITH M-NCPPC

IMG_0526Davis Buckley Architects and Planners is excited to announce that we have been engaged by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) to provide services on several projects. Tasks have included Historic Structures Reports; Conditions Assessments; Preservation Master Plans; and documentation and specifications for repair and restoration of notable historic structures.   Thus far DBA has undertaken projects at Bladensburg Peace Cross (c. 1919), Marietta (c.1813), Compton Bassett House and Chapel (c. 1777 and 1779), Adelphi Mill (c. 1796) and Oxon Hill Manor (c. 1928). Many of these are on the National Register of Historic Places or are of regional significance.  Among all of our accomplishments, DBA is most proud of the close relationships we develop with our clients ensuring sensible, cost-effective approaches to preservation while taking advantage of unique opportunities at each site. DBA looks forward to future project opportunities with the M-NCPPC.

 
Posted: March 15, 2016

CONSTRUCTION BEGINS ON PERRY POINT GRIST MILL AND MANSION HOUSE

Grist Mill 1Located at Perry Point along the Chesapeake Bay, the 1735 Grist Mill and 1750 Mansion are the two oldest structures owned by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.  After proper preservation and sensitive rehabilitation, the two structures are now integral facilities to the daily function of the Perry Point VA Medical Center.  At the onset of the project in 2011, a detailed conditions assessment for each structure was developed to guide the design of their rehabilitation to the era of significance as approved by the Maryland Historical Trust.  DBA’s design successfully underwent the Section 106 Review Process.  All design elements are LEED Compliance, although no formal certification was required for the project.

 
 
 Posted:  September 17, 2014

DBA COMPLETES THE EXTERIOR CONSERVATION OF 1817 CASTLEWOOD 

5- castlewood_083Nearly two-hundred years old, Castlewood suffered from chronic paint failure and required an expansive exterior rehabilitation.  Spectrographic analysis revealed mold blooms and bonding failure between paint layers where the binder switched from water to oil.  Once stripped of paint, carpenters performed wood epoxy and Dutchman repairs.  High brick foundation, in-ground swale gutters and chimneys were cleaned and repointed. The front porch was rebuilt, with new wood columns, metal handrails and a guardrail inspired by Tidewater houses. New shutters, replicated from historic ones, were installed to improve. Paint analysis indicated a cream and green color scheme that was replicated with exactitude. On a highly visible knoll at the bend of Iron Bridge Road, upon completion Castlewood is once again a handsome building, attesting to the County’s historic character.

Posted:  August 7, 2014

LOCKKEEPER’S HOUSE

Lock Keepers

Davis Buckley Architects and Planners (DBA) is currently working with the Trust for the National Mall on the relocation, preservation and conversion of the 1835 Lock Keeper’s House as part of the redesign of Constitution Gardens. The Lock Keeper’s house serves as a reminder of the city’s canal history, but as it is currently closed to the public, it neither interacts with its environment nor enhances the visitor’s experience. Its relocation and new found integration into Constitution Garden’s re-envisioned landscape will give new life to this iconic structure.

 
 
 
 
Posted:  March 25, 2014

DBA, WITH GENSLER, AWARDED ALEXANDRIA CITY HALL RENOVATION PROJECT

DSC03032DBA, along with Gensler, has been selected to prepare a Feasibility Study and Space Planning Study for Alexandria City Hall.  The building was designed by Adolph Cluss, the architect of the U.S. Department of Agriculture building and Washington’s Central Market, after the original Benjamin Henry Latrobe designed City Hall burned in 1871.  The U-shaped structure stood around a central courtyard until a series of renovations, alterations and additions during the 1960’s and 1980’s filled in the courtyard and reoriented the interior spaces. The DBA and Gensler team aim to preserve the unique character of this historically significant building while designing innovative interior spaces to increase the productivity and flexibility of Alexandria City Hall.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Posted:  January 13, 2014 

DBA BEGINS PRESERVATION PROJECTS FOR THE TOWN OF ABINGDON

Retirement2DBA has been selected by the town of Abingdon to develop a preservation plan for two of their historic properties, Summers Law Office and Findlay House,  in addition to the composition of a Historic Structures Report and adaptive reuse plan for a third property, Retirement.  This southwest Virginian town is one of the oldest communities west of the Blue Ridge and is designated as a Virginia Historic Landmark.  Rich with history, Abingdon highly values preserving its distinct culture and architectural heritage.  Summers Law Office is a charming 657 square foot iconic building constructed in 1872 and the Findlay House is an 1870’s residence that stands at the trailhead of the Virginia Creeper Trail as it comes into Abingdon.  Additionally, DBA will compose a Historic Structures Report for Retirement, an 1813 home that stands on the Muster Grounds which is where the volunteer militia began their march to the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1790.

Posted:  October 30, 2013

 

2013 CONFERENCE OF THE SOUTHEAST CHAPTER OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS

Holy Family Dayton 2102

DBA’s principal preservation architect and historian, Elizabeth Milnarik, Ph.D., AIA, will be delivering her paper “Mosaic Concrete and the Modern Church Interior: John Earley and the Mastery of a Material” at the 2013 Conference of the Southeast Chapter of Society of Architectural Historians (SECSAH) in Charlotte, NC.  Participants of the conference are given the opportunity to engage in the critical exploration of the architecture and urbanism of the 1950s and 1960s.

Additional information on this year’s SESAH Annual Conference can be found at: http://www.sesah2013-charlotte.org/index.html

 
 
 
 
  
 
Posted: September 26, 2013

DBA AWARDED CITY OF BOWIE PROJECT

RR Museum_TowerThe City of Bowie recently selected Davis Buckley Architects and Planners to conduct a Conditions Assessment and Preventative Maintenance Plan for the historic Bowie Railroad Museum Complex (c. 1910), Martin O’Rouke Railroad Research Library and National Capital Radio & Television Museum (c. 1906).

The Bowie Railroad Museum Complex is a rare surviving example of small-scale rail junctions and is comprised of the Railroad Depot, Interlocking Tower, Messenger Waiting Shed, and Old Town Bowie Welcome Center.  The museum offers visitors unique insight into the boom of railroad towns during the late nineteenth century and how their growth and culture was directly related to the introduction of the town station. The National Capital Radio & Television Museum, located in the 1906 Harmel House, explores the history of broadcast from the earliest days of wireless telegraphs to the introduction of color television.

All properties are under an easement held by the Maryland Historical Trust and are included in the Prince George’s County Historic Sites and Districts Inventory.

 
Posted: September 4, 2013
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